Philipp Schlicht visiting

Philipp Schlicht is visiting us today from Bristol. He’ll give us an introduction to automatic structures in the theory seminar today (2pm, CoFo 201). Abstract: Automatic structures were first studied by Khoussainov and Nerode in 1995. I will first give an introduction with a focus on automatic ordinals and groups and then talk about tree-automatic structures. In particular, I will mention some recent partial results with Jain, Khoussainov and Stephan on the isomorphism problem for tree-automatic ordinals.  

Visits and talks this week

This week we are glad to welcome two visitors here at Swansea, namely Hideki Tsuiki from Kyoto University and Kristijonas Čyra from the Imperial College of London. Hideki will give a talk on “Infinite Adequacy Theorem through Coinductive Definitions” today at 14:00 as a part of our Theory seminar series and Kristijonas will speak on “Argumentation-enabled Explainable AI Applications” this Thursday at 15:00 at the CoFo.

A Logical Account of Dishonesty by Martin Caminada

Today Martin Caminada (Cardiff University) is visiting Swansea. He will give a talk about “A Logical Account of Dishonesty” as a part of out Theory seminar series. Abstract: Although formal logic is usually applied to reason about truth, in the current  resentation we apply it to reason about dishonesty. Based on work in philosophy, we provide a  formalisation of different forms of dishonesty, including lies, half-truth and bullshit, and discuss their formal properties. We also provide maxims for dishonest communication, that agents should ideally try to satisfy, both for moral and self-interested reasons.

Ryota Akiyoshi visiting

As a part of our Theory Seminars, today we welcomed Ryota Akiyoshi from Waseda University, who gave a talk on Takeuti’s finitism. Abstract:  In this talk, we address several mathematical and philosophical issues of Gaisi Takeuti’s proof theory, who is one of the most distinguished logicians in proof theory after Hilbert and Gentzen. He furthered the realization of Hilbert’s program by formulating Gentzen’s sequent calculus for higher-oder logics, conjecturing that the cut-elimination holds for it (Takeuti’s conjecture), and obtaining several stunning results in the 1950-60’s towards the solution of his conjecture. This talk consists of two parts. (1) To summarize Takeuti’s background and the argument of the well-ordering proof of ordinals up to ε0 , (2) To evaluate it on philosophical grounds. Also, we will explain several mathematical and philosophical issues to be solved. This is joint work with Andrew Arana.

Erisa Karafili on forensic analysis of cyber-attacks

Today Erisa Karafili from the Imperial College London has given a talk on “Helping Forensic Analysts to Analyze and Attribute Cyber-Attacks” as a part of our Theory seminars. Abstract: The frequency and harmfulness of cyber-attacks are increasing every day, and with them also the amount of data that the cyber-forensics analysts need to collect and analyze. Analyzing and discovering who performed an attack or from where it originated would permit to put in act targeted mitigative and preventive measures. In my talk, I will present two techniques that help the forensics analyst to analyze and attribute cyber-attacks. The first technique is a formal analysis process that allows an analyst to filter the enormous amount of evidence collected and either identify crucial information about the attack (e.g., when it occurred, its culprit, its target) or, at the very least, perform a pre-analysis to reduce the complexity of the problem in order to then draw conclusions more swiftly and efficiently. The second technique is a novel argumentation-based reasoner (ABR) for analyzing and attributing cyber-attacks that includes in its reasoning technical and social evidence.